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Space Environment Testbeds Overview

The Space Environment Testbeds (SET) Project performs flight and data investigations to address the Living With a Star (LWS) Program goal of understanding how the Sun/Earth interactions affect humanity. It is the part of the LWS program of Science Missions and Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) ground-based investigations that respond to the following questions:

  • How and why does the Sun vary?
  • How do the Earth and planets respond?
  • What are the affects on humanity?

SET uses existing data and new data from the low-cost SET mission to achieve the following:

  • Define the mechanisms for space environment effects
  • Reduce uncertainties in the environment and its effects on spacecraft and their payloads
  • Improve design and operations guidelines and test protocols so that spacecraft anomalies and failures due to environmental effects during operations are reduced.

Living With a Star’s (LWS) program is a part of the Heliophysics Division…more

Latest News

02.28.13Van Allen Probes Discover a New Radiation Belt
03.22.12Solar Storm Dumps Gigawatts into Earth's Upper Atmosphere
04.18.11Joint Air Force-NASA Mission To Study High-radiation Orbits (Space News)
01.14.11Build-up of static electricity turned satellite into zombie (Spaceflight Now)
09.29.10Space radiation hits record high (NewScientist)
08.06.10A Solar Tsunami (SKY and Telescope)
07.16.10Space Weather Turns into an International Problem
06.04.10As the Sun Awakens, NASA Keeps a Wary Eye on Space Weather
04.21.10First Light for the Solar Dynamics Observatory
04.21.10NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory producing sun science that doubles as eye candy (Scientific American)

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Recent SET News

SET Payload > The SET payload, consisting of 4 board experiments and a space weather monitor, is currently undergoing spacecraft level environmental tests at Kirtland Air Force Base, NM.

Depiction of SET payload> Depiction of the SET payload on the AFRL Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft